Classics and new gems in Stuttgart

 

The spiralling trefoil arrangement of the exhibition spaces in the Mercedes-Benz Museum, designed by UNStudio, is a reference to rotary piston engine. Photo: Sami Heikinheimo, Archtours.

The spiralling trefoil arrangement of the exhibition spaces in the Mercedes-Benz Museum, designed by UNStudio, is a reference to rotary piston engine. Photo: Sami Heikinheimo, Archtours.

Weissenhof Estate Museum operates from the two-family house designed by Le Corbusier (1927). Photo: Sami Heikinheimo, Archtours.

Weissenhof Estate Museum operates from the two-family house designed by Le Corbusier (1927). Photo: Sami Heikinheimo, Archtours.

Stuttgart, a vibrant city at the very centre of Europe, is a diverse destination for friends of architecture visiting Germany and one that has regrettably been somewhat overshadowed by Germany’s other cities. Stuttgart is the capital of Baden-Württemberg, a major university city and a hub of hi-tech and automotive industry. Stuttgart is well-known among architects especially for its classic buildings: the avant-garde Weissenhof Estate built for Deutsche Werkbund and James Stirling’s postmodern landmark, Staatsgalerie. Besides these well-known classics, Stuttgart has seen the emergence of high-quality contemporary architecture and forward-looking urban development.

The largest building site in Stuttgart is part of the Stuttgart 21 project. A 60-kilometre long new rail link is being built between Wendlingen and Ulm, which will reduce travel time from Stuttgart to its environs and further destinations in Europe. The old terminus will be preserved but it will be combined with a new, underground through station and a park built next to it. The new station will be a zero-energy building. The construction work is scheduled to be completed in 2021.

Killesberg Hill Urban Quarter is a new development merging housing, jobs and commerce and it was designed by David Chipperfield, Kees Christiaanse, Baumschlager & Eberle and Ortner & Ortner. Photo: Sami Heikinheimo, Archtours.

Killesberg Hill Urban Quarter is a new development merging housing, jobs and commerce and it was designed by David Chipperfield, Kees Christiaanse, Baumschlager & Eberle and Ortner & Ortner. Photo: Sami Heikinheimo, Archtours.

Perhaps the most interesting of the new, already completed developments in Stuttgart is Killesberg Hill Urban Quarter. Built by Franz Fürst and designed by an international team of architects, the development comprises twelve buildings where housing, jobs and commerce come together in a setting marked by distinguished exterior design and a nearby park.

The latest ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion by the University of Stuttgart Institute of Computational Design and the Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design is built using robot technology. The inspiration for its structure came from the anatomy of the water spider. Photo: Sami Heikinheimo, Archtours.

The latest ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion by the University of Stuttgart Institute of Computational Design and the Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design is built using robot technology. The inspiration for its structure came from the anatomy of the water spider. Photo: Sami Heikinheimo, Archtours.

The annual research pavilion projects of the University of Stuttgart offer prime examples of groundbreaking architectural and technological development that benefit from a multidisciplinary approach. The latest ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion project is based on robot technology. Other points of interest in Stuttgart include the Stuttgart City Library by Eun Young Yi, and Kubus, the Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, designed by Hascher & Jehler Architects. Mercedes-Benz and Porsche both have their stylish museum buildings in Stuttgart.

We organise tailored architectural excursions to Stuttgart for your work team. Depending on your interests, the tour may include classics, ecological building projects, new public buildings, high-standard housing developments or infrastructure projects, among others. We are also happy to arrange meetings with specialists, which will add depth to your excursion and make it even more rewarding.